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  FLOWERS IN GREEK MYTHOLOGY

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Orchid-Orchis
In Greek mythology, Orchis was the son of a nymph and a satyr. During a celebratory feast for Bacchus, Orchis committed the sacrilege of attempting to rape a priestess, resulting in his being torn apart by wild beasts, then metamorphosing into a slender and modest plant.
 
 

Theophrastus was the first of the Western authors to mention orchids. It was he who first applied the name Orchis scientifically, echoing the myth of Orchis and reflecting the resemblance of the double root tubers to the male genitalia that got old Orchis in trouble in the first place. Greek women thought they could control the sex of their unborn children with Orchid roots. If the father ate large, new tubers, the child would be male; if the mother ate small tubers, the child would be female.

Almond-Almond tree
Greek mythology tells of the beautiful princess Phyllis, who was The daughter of a Thracian king. She fell in love with Theseus' son Demophon. The young man had ended up there while sailing home from Troy, and the king gave him part of his kingdom and married him to his daughter.

After some time Demophon missed Athens so much that he asked to go home for a while. Phyllis agreed after he had promised he would be back soon, and off he sailed. Phyllis was left waiting at the altar on her wedding day by her intended, Demophon. Phyllis waited for years for him to return, but finally died of a broken heart. In sympathy, the gods transformed Phyllis into an almond tree, which became a symbol of hope. When the errant, remorseful Demonphon returned to find Phyllis as a leafless, flowerless tree, he embraced the tree. The tree suddenly burst into bloom, a demonstration of love not conquered by death.

 

  FLOWERS IN GRREK MYTHOLOGY 

 

 

 

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